My first post I will dedicate to Roald Amundsen - probably the first Norwegian superstar!

The first man to the South pole is in the book "Great by Choice" by Jim Collins and Morten Hansen and made the core example of what the entire book is all about. After reading this book three times, I, of course, had to read "The Race to the South Pole" to understand this story better.

Some of the key learnings from my reading, I'll illustrate with a few pictures: 

  Competition (Scott) had the best technology and much more capital. He did not win. Here with his cool and innovative motorized sled, that were not tested in the ice-cold climate and never came to any real use. 

Competition (Scott) had the best technology and much more capital. He did not win. Here with his cool and innovative motorized sled, that were not tested in the ice-cold climate and never came to any real use. 

 Scott brought ponies for his sleds. Now you may think that this was obviously a very stupid idea, but the ponies were actually very used to extreme cold climate since they came from  Siberia . The problem with the ponies was that they needed a lot of food, which was not naturally available. And they could not stand the  temperatures  of -60 C to -80 C over time because they sweated too much, so Scott ended up man-hauling the sleds, which was not effective at all. Scott was not well prepared. 

Scott brought ponies for his sleds. Now you may think that this was obviously a very stupid idea, but the ponies were actually very used to extreme cold climate since they came from Siberia. The problem with the ponies was that they needed a lot of food, which was not naturally available. And they could not stand the temperatures of -60 C to -80 C over time because they sweated too much, so Scott ended up man-hauling the sleds, which was not effective at all. Scott was not well prepared. 

  Dogs, which Amundsen brought, could at worst case eat each other - and Amundsen actually planned with this as a food supply for them! And - he brought skis and lots of room for error with   huge   amounts of food-supply.   He had specifically trained with the best survivors in this climate - the   Intuits   - and learned to master the dog-sledge handling. 

Dogs, which Amundsen brought, could at worst case eat each other - and Amundsen actually planned with this as a food supply for them! And - he brought skis and lots of room for error with huge amounts of food-supply. He had specifically trained with the best survivors in this climate - the Intuits - and learned to master the dog-sledge handling. 

 Look at the different ways of organizing and thinking. And look at how different they viewed the perspective of luck!? 

Look at the different ways of organizing and thinking. And look at how different they viewed the perspective of luck!? 

 Amundsen as the first man ever to the South Pole December 14th, 1911 was a triumph. Scott also reached the South Pole five weeks later, only to find the Norwegian flag well planted, and even some extra food supplies for him. Because of the much longer time used than planned for, he, unfortunately ran out of food supplies and none of his expedition members made it home. 

Amundsen as the first man ever to the South Pole December 14th, 1911 was a triumph. Scott also reached the South Pole five weeks later, only to find the Norwegian flag well planted, and even some extra food supplies for him. Because of the much longer time used than planned for, he, unfortunately ran out of food supplies and none of his expedition members made it home. 

This is just a fraction of all the very interesting insights and relevant experiences gained from a leader almost a 100 years ago - which is still highly relevant today, according to Jim Collins. I really urge you to read this story, together with "Great by Choice" and see for yourself why Amundsen's way of leading is put as the core example for managing Great companies today!  

A summary of the book: http://www.jimcollins.com/books/great-by-choice.html

Find out for yourself why the concepts of "fanatic discipline", "empirical creativity" and "productive paranoia" are the core for leading in a high-risk world. What is your 20-mile march? Do you first shoot bullets, then fire the cannonball? How do you live above the death line? 

Or, a little interview with Jim Collins where he quickly shares some of his profound insights: 

Listening to what he says: 

The evidence is quite clear that the pioneering innovators rarely win. We Americans tend to think that our big trump card, in the end, is innovation. I have come to the conclusion that we are wrong. Our great distinctive strength is our ability to scale innovation.
— Jim Collins

Or, what I myself in 2005 invented as a new English word "to businessize", which was the source of the name of my company "Businessizer AS". This is what I want to do, and this has been my belief now for over ten years! As the inventor of the word and term, I have taken a full liberty of trying to define the meaning and content of it:

Businessizer
\ˈbiz-nes-ˌī- zər\  (many Norwegians really struggle with the pronunciation

  1. to make great business out of great ideas and innovations
  2. to spot large value creation potentials and find practical solutions to real problems, but not only innovating, but commercializing the solution and scaling the business through being well prepared, hard work, and learning from mistakes. A key component of this is to be an excellent team player, realizing your own strengths and weaknesses, building a complementary team around yourself that confronts brutal facts and challenges the thinking, to build something together larger than yourself
  3. the word can also have a double meaning with hinting to the importance of Size, Business with no size, is not a success. At least not when your perspective is to make the world better!

 

Now, as I am unemployed, I am seeking new challenges and opportunities, capitalizing on all my experience with businessizing and growing great companies. Please contact me if you are in need of a battle-hardened soldier, or would like some consultancy services! :-) 

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